How To Use the STAR Method for Behavioral Interviewing

In order to be successful in behavioral interviewing:

1. Wait until the interviewer is finished asking the question, pause and think about the question and your story before answsering the question.

2. Make sure you answer the question completely. If they ask a question with “and why” make sure you explain why.

3. Use examples of situations from your experiences on your resume where you demonstrated desired behaviors.

4. State your answer as a story that you can tell.

5. Be specific and detailed. Make sure the story relates to the question and isn’t too general. Briefly tell them about the situation, what you did specifically, and the positive result or outcome. Your answer should contain these four steps Situation, Task, Action, Result or “STAR”) for optimum success.

6. Quantify your results. Give specific numbers whenever possible. For example: “I was a supervisor.” could be “As Supervisor, I trained and evaluated 6 employees.”

What To Do With Your Hands and Arms When Networking or On Video

85% of what you communicate is not with words. It’s through the tone of your voice, the way you sit and a wealth of other messages that your body involuntarily sends.

What to do with hands and arms when interviewing or filming a video resume:

  • Clasping your hands is a signal that you are closed off.
  • Putting your palms together with one thumb over the other says that you need reassurance.
  • You should never cross your arms over your chest, since this gives the impression that you are not in agreement, closed off, defensive or insecure.
  • Open hands and showing palms show that nothing is being concealed.

To come across confident, have your hands open and relaxed on the table or at your side. When your body is open, you project trustworthiness and will actually feel more confident. It is ok to use some hand gestures, as long as they’re in sync with what you’re saying, and not too wild.

Control How Your Viewed by Potential Employers with Social Media

83% of companies say they use Google search (or other search engines) to compile information on potential candidates. Some admit they’ve eliminated candidates based on their findings.

Below are suggestions to help control how you are viewed by potential employers:

– Have you ever used Google to search your own name? You may be amazed at what you find and what hiring professionals are finding as well. Go to www.google.com and type your name in “quotes” to search.

– Control findings by setting up your own social media and social networking sites. These will appear on page 1 of the search results when employers google you. Some of the more popular sites are FaceBook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube. (make sure content is interesting, professional, positive, and genuine).

– Blog about your industry and area of expertise. Your posts will also show up when employers search for you, and showing your expertise and knowledge makes a great impression. I use WordPress… it’s fairly easy to use and has a great “help” site for those less experienced bloggers (support.wordpress.com)

Be patient. It does not happen overnight – but when it does, the results are amazing. Don’t get frustrated and give up if you don’t get immediate results.

Something else to consider… when preparing for a job interview; do a Google search on your interviewer. The more you know about them, the better.