What To Do With Your Hands and Arms When Networking or On Video

85% of what you communicate is not with words. It’s through the tone of your voice, the way you sit and a wealth of other messages that your body involuntarily sends.

What to do with hands and arms when interviewing or filming a video resume:

  • Clasping your hands is a signal that you are closed off.
  • Putting your palms together with one thumb over the other says that you need reassurance.
  • You should never cross your arms over your chest, since this gives the impression that you are not in agreement, closed off, defensive or insecure.
  • Open hands and showing palms show that nothing is being concealed.

To come across confident, have your hands open and relaxed on the table or at your side. When your body is open, you project trustworthiness and will actually feel more confident. It is ok to use some hand gestures, as long as they’re in sync with what you’re saying, and not too wild.

Control How Your Viewed by Potential Employers with Social Media

83% of companies say they use Google search (or other search engines) to compile information on potential candidates. Some admit they’ve eliminated candidates based on their findings.

Below are suggestions to help control how you are viewed by potential employers:

– Have you ever used Google to search your own name? You may be amazed at what you find and what hiring professionals are finding as well. Go to www.google.com and type your name in “quotes” to search.

– Control findings by setting up your own social media and social networking sites. These will appear on page 1 of the search results when employers google you. Some of the more popular sites are FaceBook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube. (make sure content is interesting, professional, positive, and genuine).

– Blog about your industry and area of expertise. Your posts will also show up when employers search for you, and showing your expertise and knowledge makes a great impression. I use WordPress… it’s fairly easy to use and has a great “help” site for those less experienced bloggers (support.wordpress.com)

Be patient. It does not happen overnight – but when it does, the results are amazing. Don’t get frustrated and give up if you don’t get immediate results.

Something else to consider… when preparing for a job interview; do a Google search on your interviewer. The more you know about them, the better.

Having Trouble Landing the Interview, And the Job?

I was talking with a client last month about how things were going since the production of her video resume. She had previously been looking for a job for over 6 months, and only landed 2 interviews.

The good news is, she had 5 interviews (4 in person, 1 over the phone) in the last month. The bad news, the interviews didn’t seem to go well. She said they would ask her a few questions, and then seemed to lose interest and the interview was over. So I pitched her a few standard interview questions to gauge her responses and I think we found the problem.

I didn’t put 2 and 2 together until yesterday, when I was producing an interview style video resume for someone else. I had sent him the instructions for preparing, and called the day before the appointment to make sure he didn’t have any questions. When he showed up for the appointment, he hadn’t even selected his interview questions, thinking he could wing it. He checked off a few questions on the spot and said “Just ask me these. I can do this.”

Ok, the customer is always right, right? So I pitched him a few of the questions (off camera) to see how it went…

Have you ever answered an interview question, then later thought “ugh, I should have said…”. Or even worse, realized you should have said something different while answering the question, started back peddling and trying to correct the answer and end up rambling? Things can sometimes sound better in our heads then they do when they come out of our mouths! And sometimes, we don’t even realize how the things we say come across at all, especially when we’re nervous, under a microscope being interviewed by someone else.

Both clients seemed to have similar difficulties answering interview questions :

  • Concisely including all pertinent information
  • Coming across positive

Below are a few tips I tell my clients when filming an interview style video resume to avoid the “foot in mouth syndrome”. These also apply to telephone or live job interviews.

Never be negative. ALWAYS be respectful of others and do not place blame. State your answers in a positive form.

Examples:
WRONG: I’m looking for a new job because there aren’t any opportunities available at my current company.

RIGHT: I’m looking into new opportunities that might be available in other companies and industries that can help me to grow professionally.

WRONG: There was an occasion when this customer was being irate and yelled at me.

RIGHT: There was an occasion when I helped a customer who was very upset because…

Never interrupt. Wait until the interviewer is finished asking the question. Take a moment to pause and consider the question before you start to answer. Then answer the question clearly and completely.

Tell the Story. Use the STAR method of answering interview questions. Describe the Situation or Task clearly, discuss the Actions you took, and talk about the positive Results that occurred due to your actions.

Do not ramble. Listen carefully to the question, and answer it concisely without unnecessary background information. Once the question has been answered, stop talking. :)
Do not back track, reiterate, or continue adding more information.