Looking Your Best on Camera

When someone considers appearing in their own video, one of the questions they often ask is ,”Can you make me look better on camera?”

To answer your question, yes and no.

Although there are a few things that can be done in post, it’s not as easy as tweaking a picture to remove a blemish or wrinkle. But there are a few things you can do when preparing for and shooting the video that can help you look better on camera.

First, if you’re nervous or self conscious about how you look, you can avoid doing close-ups. We use what’s called b-roll to show the subject at more of a distance when they’re doing something they’re comfortable with instead of looking into the lens of a camera. This can also make a video more interesting.

To make your skin look “softer” or younger, use softer lighting (something with a warmer color temperature). Florescent lighting and outdoor lighting are “bluer”. Indoor, incandescent lighting is softer.

You can also sometimes make yourself look a little bit thinner on camera by standing at a slight angle. Stand with one foot slightly in front of the other, pointing forward, and the other foot pointing to the side. You sometimes appear to be thinner if your body isn’t facing the camera directly.

But What about the blemishes and wrinkles? It’s simple. Use a little make-up. CN Video works with Mary Kay consultants who can provide skin care and make-up tips for our clients before they appear on camera.

We hope this was helpful. Feel free to check out some of our other videos, or if you have more specific questions, give us a call at 314-843-3663 (that’s 314-video me) and we’ll be happy to chat with you. Thanks for watching. I’ll be CN you on Video!

Do I Have to be on Camera?

Not everyone is comfortable being on camera. So you might ask yourself, do I have to? The answer is… not necessarily. Today I’ll talk about some alternatives to being on camera.

If you own your business and you’re the face of the company we recommend you appear in your video, but there are options.

One option is to show footage (called b-roll) of you working from a distance while the viewer listens to your message. This helps you avoid the awkwardness of talking into a camera while still allowing you to remain the face of your business.
If you really don’t want to be on camera, there is the option to have an assistant or someone within the organization with a spirited personality represent the company in the video.

Another option to avoid the camera altogether is to go with an animated video, like a whiteboard board sketch. Where you describe your process and an animated hand draws it out on a whiteboard animation.

Or we can do other types of full blown animation including motion graphics. These methods allow you to avoid being on camera while keeping the video visually interesting and relevant.

So, there are plenty of options that you can choose from without having to appear on camera if you’re really uncomfortable with it.
But if you’re feeling courageous and want to give acting a try, we can help make you come across more comfortable and confident in your video with body language tips, a comfortable atmosphere and a little coaching and guidance.

We hope you found this useful and feel free to check out some of our other videos. If you have any questions, give us a call at 314-843-3663 that’s 314-VIDEO ME. Thanks for watching and I’ll be CN U on Video.

Benefits of Background Music

When it comes to video you may not have thought about whether or not music makes a difference. But it actually is a pretty important factor to consider. Today I’ll talk about the some of the benefits and best uses of background music.

You’ve probably watched a video that didn’t have background music. (this one for example)

It probably sounds ok if you don’t have anything to compare it to, but add a little background music.. and it adds interest to the video.

Notice the difference? Background music can keep people’s attention, make your video seem more lively, and set the tone of your video.
You can also remove the music from a section of the video… to emphasize what’s being said…

When adding music to a video, there are a few things to consider. Make sure it’s at an appropriate volume and doesn’t distract from the dialogue. During a long pause it’s okay to increase the volume a bit.

Also, be careful about using copyrighted music. This may mean you can’t use your favorite pop song, even if you’ve purchased the .mp3. If your video is for commercial use, you could be sued if you don’t have the proper licensing.

We subscribe to a music library which allows us the proper licensing to use music in our videos, and on our clients behalf. If you (or your production company) don’t subscribe to this type of service, make sure any music used is public domain and permits commercial use

We hope this was helpful and feel free to check out some of our other videos.